Dialysis Access Clinic on Eastern Shore

Clinic in Easton Provides Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Access for Patients with Kidney Disease


Surgeons at the University of Maryland dialysis vascular access clinic in Easton specialize in the surgical care of patients with kidney disease. The clinic opened at the University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton in 2009 to bring world-class surgical care from Baltimore to serve patients from Delaware to Virginia, including the entire Eastern Shore of Maryland.

At clinic, patients will be seen by the kidney and pancreas transplant surgeons from the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore – one of the largest kidney transplant programs in the country who specialize in the surgical care of patients with End Stage Renal Disease. The clinic is also supported by a dedicated team of interventional radiologists that works together with the surgeons.

Clinic is held seven times a month on the following days:

  • Every Tuesday
  • Second and third Friday of the month
  • Fourth Wednesday of the month

Review the frequently asked questions below, and 410-822-1000 ext. 5067 to learn more about the dialysis vascular access clinic.

Q: What types of patients does this clinic serve?

A:

This clinic serves patients who are on or are planning to begin peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis (renal replacement therapy) who live from Virginia and Maryland’s eastern shores into Delaware.

The goal of the clinic is to either get hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis access placed expeditiously so that they can reduce their risk of catheter-based infection, which occur when temporary hemodialysis catheters are used for prolonged periods.  

Since the clinic began in 2009, dialysis units on the eastern shore have seen a significant drop in the number of patients being dialyzed using temporary hemodialysis catheters. This drop has led to fewer patients being admitted to the hospital to treat blood infections related to temporary hemodialysis catheters.

Q: How does someone become a patient at the dialysis vascular access clinic?

A:

There are two ways someone can become a patient at the dialysis vascular access clinic:

  1. Patients can be referred by a local nephrologist.
  2. Dialysis units may refer a patient who needs permanent access or is having trouble with the permanent access they are currently using.

 

Q: What services are provided at the dialysis access clinic in Easton?

A:

Staff at the clinic works closely with nephrologists and local dialysis units to coordinate interventional radiology services so that surgeons can de-clot access sites or fix narrowed access sites. These procedures are performed at the University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton. 

Q: What is the difference between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis?

A:

Both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are used to treat kidney failure.

Hemodialysis requires an access portal created by a surgeon. Once the access has been created by a surgeon, healthcare professionals must administer the hemodialysis within a clinical setting. This means patients must come to a dialysis clinic 3-5 times a week. Most hemodialysis patients receive temporary central venous catheters, which carry a higher risk of infection because of how often they get changed. Catheter-based infections can enter the bloodstream and lead to hospitalization and even death.  

Peritoneal dialysis requires a surgeon to place a peritoneal dialysis into the lining of the abdominal wall via a catheter. Peritoneal dialysis can be administered by the patient and does not require the patient to be in a clinical setting for treatment. Patients can do their dialysis at home or any other clean place. 

Q: Where are the dialysis access surgeries performed?

A:

The access surgeries are performed at the University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton. When the time comes, transplant surgeries are performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore. 

Q: Who are the surgeons in this clinic?

A:

All three surgeons are transplant surgeons from the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore. They each have faculty appointments at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and make special trips to Easton to improve the quality of life for patients on dialysis.

  1. David B. Leeser, MD, FACS
  2. Eugene Schweitzer, MD, FACS
  3. Silke Niederhaus, MD

This page was last updated: January 3, 2014

         
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