University of Maryland School of Medicine Researcher Honored for Prostate Cancer Study

For immediate release: December 18, 2015

Contact:

Karen Warmkessel

kwarmkessel@umm.edu | 410-328-8919

Dr. M. Minhaj Siddiqui Receives Award from Society of Urologic Oncology for JAMA Article on Use of Advanced Imaging to Detect High-Risk Prostate Cancer

University of Maryland School of Medicine researcher M. Minhaj Siddiqui, MD has been honored by the Society of Urologic Oncology for a 2015 study published in JAMA analyzing the use of new advanced imaging technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer.

Dr. Siddiqui, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) and director of urologic robotic surgery at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, received the “Paper of the Year” award at the professional organization’s annual meeting this month in Washington, D.C. The Society of Urologic Oncology presents the award each year to recognize outstanding scientific research by young urologic oncologists.

Dr. Siddiqui was the lead author of the study, “Comparison of MR/Ultrasound Fusion-Guided Biopsy for the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer,” published in JAMA in January 2015. The study found that 30 percent more high-risk prostate cancers needing aggressive treatment were diagnosed with targeted fusion-guided biopsy than with standard biopsy. In addition, 17 percent fewer low-risk cancers were diagnosed with the new approach, compared to the standard method. The study was the culmination of a seven-year effort led by Peter Pinto, M.D., at the National Cancer Institute, where Dr. Siddiqui was prior to coming to the University of Maryland.

“With fusion technology, we now have a tool to help us differentiate high-risk cancers from low-risk ones that may require minimal or no treatment,” Dr. Siddiqui says. He is continuing his research on the use of this new technology, which is now available at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

“Dr. Siddiqui’s recognition by the Society of Urologic Oncology is well-deserved. His study is a potential game-changer because it demonstrated there may be a better, more effective way to diagnose and treat prostate cancer, particularly high-risk cancer that requires more aggressive therapy,” says UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, vice president for medical affairs at the University of Maryland and the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “We are most fortunate that Dr. Siddiqui is continuing this important research as a member of our faculty.”

About the University of Maryland School of Medicine
The University of Maryland School of Medicine was chartered in 1807 and is the first public medical school in the United States. It continues today as an innovative leader in accelerating innovation and discovery in medicine. The School of Medicine is the founding school of the University of Maryland and is an integral part of the 11-campus University System of Maryland. Located on the University of Maryland’s Baltimore campus, the School of Medicine works closely with the University of Maryland Medical Center to provide a research-intensive, academic and clinically based education. With 43 academic departments, centers and institutes and a faculty of more than 4,000 physicians and research scientists plus more than $400 million in extramural funding, the School is regarded as one of the leading biomedical research institutions in the U.S. with top-tier faculty and programs in cancer, brain science, surgery and transplantation, trauma and emergency medicine, vaccine development and human genomics, among other centers of excellence. The School is not only concerned with the health of the citizens of Maryland and the nation, but also has a global vision, with research and treatment facilities in more than 30 countries around the world. For more information, visit www.medschool.umaryland.edu.

About the University of Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center
The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, a National Cancer Institute-designated center in Baltimore affiliated with the University of Maryland Medical Center and University of Maryland School of Medicine, offers a multidisciplinary approach to treating all types of cancer and has an active cancer research program. It is ranked in the top 50 cancer programs in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. For more information, go to www.umgcc.org.

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