Hemólisis

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Definición

Es la descomposición de los glóbulos rojos.

Ver también: anemia hemolítica.

Información

Los glóbulos rojos viven normalmente de 110 a 120 días. Después de esto, se descomponen de manera natural y generalmente son eliminados de la circulación por medio del bazo.

Algunas enfermedades y procesos provocan que los glóbulos rojos se descompongan demasiado pronto. Esto le exige a la médula ósea producir más glóbulos rojos de lo normal. El equilibrio entre la descomposición y la producción de los glóbulos rojos determina qué tan bajo llega ser su conteo.

Las enfermedades que pueden causar hemólisis comprenden:

  • Reacciones inmunitarias
  • Infecciones
  • Medicamentos
  • Toxinas y venenos
  • Tratamientos como la hemodiálisis o el uso del sistema de circulación extracorporal

Referencias

Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 163.

Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias:  red cell membrane and metabolic defects In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 164.

Gallagher PG, Jarolim P. Red blood cell membrane disorders. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Shattil SS, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 46.

Powers A, Silberstein LE. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Shattil SS, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 47.

Schrier S, Price EA. Extrinsic nonimmune hemolytic anemias. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Shattil SS, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 48.

Version Info

  • Last Reviewed on 02/08/2012
  • Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Palm Beach Cancer Institute, West Palm Beach, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network; Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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This page was last updated: May 31, 2013

         
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