Toluene and xylene poisoning

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Toluene and xylene are strong compounds that are used in many household and industrial products. Toluene and xylene poisoning can occur when someone swallows these substances, breathes in their fumes, or when these substances touch the skin.

This article is for information only. Do NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poison exposure. If you or someone you are with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

Alternative Names

Xylene poisoning

Poisonous Ingredient

The harmful substances in these products are:

  • Toluene (methylbenzene, phenylmethane)
  • Xylene (ortho-xylene, meta-xylene, para-xylene)

Where Found

Toluene and xylene are used in:

  • Fingernail polish
  • Glues and adhesives
  • Lacquers
  • Octane booster in gasoline
  • Paints
  • Paint thinners
  • Printing and leather tanning processes
  • Rubber and plastic cements
  • Wood stains

Other products may also contain toluene and xylene.


Below are symptoms of toluene and xylene poisoning in different parts of the body.



  • Bloody stools
  • Abdominal pain (severe)
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting (may be bloody)



  • Kidney damage




  • Dry, cracked skin
  • Pale skin

Home Care

Get medical help right away. Do NOT make the person throw up unless poison control or a health care provider tells you to. If the substance is on the skin or in the eyes, flush with lots of water for at least 15 minutes.

If the person swallowed the substance, give them water or milk right away, if a provider tells you to do so. Do NOT give anything to drink if the person has symptoms that make it hard to swallow. These include vomiting, convulsions, or a decreased level of alertness. If the person breathed in fumes, move them to fresh air right away.

Before Calling Emergency

Have this information ready:

  • Person's age, weight, and condition
  • Name of the product (and ingredients, if known)
  • Time it was swallowed
  • Amount swallowed

Poison Control

Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.

This is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

What to Expect at the Emergency Room

Take the container to the hospital with you, if possible.

The provider will measure and monitor the person’s vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Symptoms will be treated.

The person may receive:

  • Breathing support, including tube through the mouth into the lungs and breathing machine (ventilator)
  • Bronchoscopy -- camera down the throat to see burns in the airways and lungs
  • Chest x-ray
  • EKG (electrocardiogram or heart tracing)
  • Endoscopy -- camera down the throat to see burns in the esophagus and the stomach
  • Fluids through a vein (by IV)
  • Tube through the mouth into the stomach to wash out the stomach (gastric lavage)
  • Surgery to remove burned skin
  • Washing of the skin (irrigation), perhaps every few hours for several days

Outlook (Prognosis)

How well someone does depends on how severe their poisoning is and how quickly they receive treatment. The faster medical help is given, the better the chance for recovery.

Inhaling these substances for long periods of time can cause permanent brain damage. This type of damage is seen in people who "sniff" these substances on purpose to get high.


Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 158.

Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94.

Zosel AE. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 143.

Version Info

  • Last reviewed on 11/4/2015
  • Jesse Borke, MD, FACEP, FAAEM, Attending Physician at FDR Medical Services/Millard Fillmore Suburban Hospital, Buffalo, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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