Claw foot

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Definition

Claw foot is a deformity of the foot. The toe joint nearest the ankle is bent upward and the other toe joints are bent downward. The toe looks like a claw.

Alternative Names

Claw toes

Considerations

Claw toes may be present at birth (congenital). The condition can also develop later in life because of other disorders (acquired). Claw toes may be caused by a nerve problem in the legs or a spinal cord problem. The cause is unknown in many cases.

Most of the time, claw toes are not harmful in themselves. They may be the first sign of a more serious disease of the nervous system.

Claw toes may cause pain and lead to calluses on the top of the toe over the first joint, but may also be painless. The condition may create problems wearing shoes.

Causes

Causes may include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you think you may be getting claw toes.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The health care provider will do an exam to check for muscle, nerve, and spine problems. The physical exam will most likely include extra attention to the feet and hands.

You will be asked questions about your condition, such as:

  • When did you first notice this?
  • Is it getting worse?
  • Does it affect both feet?
  • Do you have other symptoms at the same time?
  • Do you have any abnormal feelings in your feet?
  • Do any other family members have the same condition?

The abnormal shape of the toe can increase pressure and cause calluses or ulcers on your toes. You may need to wear special shoes to ease pressure. Claw toes can also be treated surgically.

References

Murphy AG. Lesser toe abnormalities. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 83.

Version Info

  • Last reviewed on 3/5/2015
  • C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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