Possible Interactions with: Copper

Interactions

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use copper supplements without first talking to your health care provider.

Birth control medications and estrogen following menopause -- Birth control medications and estrogen replacement for post-menopausal women can increase blood levels of copper. Therefore, copper supplements are not appropriate and may be cause for concern in individuals taking either of these medications.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) -- Copper binds to NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen and naproxen) and appears to enhance their anti-inflammatory activity.

Penicillamine -- Penicillamine (a medication used to treat Wilson's disease and rheumatoid arthritis) reduces copper levels that may be the intended use, as in the case of Wilson's disease.

Allopurinol -- Test tube studies suggest that allopurinol (Zyloprim), a medication used to treat gout, may reduce copper levels.

Cimetidine -- Animal studies show that cimetidine (Tagamet), a medication used to treat ulcers and gastric esophageal reflux disease (when acid from the stomach enters the esophagus and causes heartburn and indigestion), may elevate copper levels in the body leading to damage of the liver and other organs.

Nifedipine -- In a human study, a lower concentration of copper was found in red blood cells after use of nifedipine (Procardia or Adalat).

Zinc -- Several laboratory and human studies have found that high levels of supplemental zinc taken over extended periods of time may result in decreased copper absorption in the intestines and copper deficiency. However, some studies in humans suggest that high dietary zinc may not interfere with the actual tissue or plasma concentrations of copper. Ask your health care provider if you need zinc and copper supplementation.

Drug Interactions

Alternative Names

Copper

Version Info

  • Last Reviewed on 05/25/2007
  • Ernest B. Hawkins, MS, BSPharm, RPh, Health Education Resources; and Steven D. Ehrlich, N.M.D., private practice specializing in complementary and alternative medicine, Phoenix, AZ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch)

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2013 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

This page was last updated: May 31, 2013

         
Average rating (0)