Alcoholic ketoacidosis

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Alcoholic ketoacidosis is the buildup of ketones in the blood. Ketones are a type of acid that form when the body breaks down fat for energy.

The condition is an

form of .

Alternative Names

Ketoacidosis - alcoholic


Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by very heavy alcohol use. It most often occurs in a malnourished person who drinks large amounts of alcohol every day.


Symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis include:

Exams and Tests

Tests may include:

  • Arterial blood gases (measure the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood)
  • Blood alcohol level
  • Blood chemistries, and liver function tests
  • CBC (complete blood count, measures red and white blood cells, and platelets, which help blood to clot)
  • Prothrombin time (PT, a different measure of blood clotting, often abnormal from liver disease)
  • Toxicology (poison) screening
  • Urine ketones


Treatment may involve fluids (salt and sugar solution) given through a vein. You may need to have frequent blood tests. You may get vitamin supplements to treat nutritional deficiencies caused by excess alcohol use.

People with this condition are usually admitted to the hospital, often to the intensive care unit (ICU). Additional medicines may be given to prevent alcohol withdrawal.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Prompt medical attention improves the overall outlook. How severe the alcoholism is, and the presence of liver disease or other problems, may also affect the outlook.

Possible Complications

This can be a life-threatening condition. Complications may include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

If you or someone else has symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis, seek emergency medical help.


Limiting the amount of alcohol you drink may help prevent this condition.


Carpenter CR. Alcoholic ketoacidosis, In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine: Clinical Essentials. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 161.

Seifter JL. Acid-Base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 118.

Version Info

  • Last reviewed on 4/30/2015
  • Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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